All posts filed under: Recipes

Blackberry Marble Cheesecake

More fool you bakers! This ‘no bake’ cheesecake looks like it has taken ages to prepare, but in reality it takes 20 mins to put together and 2 hours to set in the fridge. Try it now while blackberries are in season and free on the roadside! Sit down and watch this week’s Great British bakers struggle to work their ovens while you tuck into ‘no bake’ cheesecake heaven. Serves 6-8 people in an 8 inch loose based tart tin For the buttery bisuit base: 100g butter 250g disgestive biscuits 100g soft light brown sugar For the cream cheese topping:  180g/ 1 tub of cream cheese 300ml double cream 200g icing sugar For the blackberry marble drizzle: 250g blackberries 1 lemon 50g caster sugar mint leaves Reserve 10 blackberries for garnish later and add the rest to a small pan with the juice of half a lemon and the caster sugar. Heat until bubbling then simmer for 10 minutes until the berries have broken down and the sauce has thickened. Then leave to cool. Gently heating the butter in a small …

Keralan runny eggs, curry leaf & coconut curry

The perfect healthy filling vegetarian brunch I know the words egg and curry might not instantly make your mouth water. What about spicy coconut curry and a soft boiled eggs with a runny yolk? Better? Ok, now try the three musketeers of any curry – ginger, garlic and chilli – tempered in coconut oil with curry leaves and mustard seeds. Finished with coconut milk and fresh herbs and topped by perfectly soft boiled eggs. Eaten with flat breads to dip in the yolk this dish is not only delicious but really healthy and a perfect brunch to set you up for the day. Egg curry was recommended by a blog follower as a ‘favourite curry dish’. A similar dish was served up every morning for breakfast when we were in Kerala, with hot chapatis and yoghurt. Like an Indian egg on toast. Keralan runny eggs, curry leaf & coconut curry Serves 2 as a brunch or lunch 4 eggs 1 onion 1 large, or two medium tomatoes, diced 2 inch piece of ginger 4 hot green chillies 1 tbsp coconut oil a small …

Mean clean beefburgers

Cooking as a couple can go one of two ways: either you get into an argument over how fine to dice your onions and you end up eating the finished product 4 hours late in complete silence (all been there?). Other times you take tips from each other in order to create something truly epic. We’ve been making burgers together since we started dating, taking influences from our favourite restaurants and cook books, in an attempt to create the perfect home burger. Our burger recipe is the product of lots of different trials (and some catastrophical fails) until we had developed the perfect formula. What to do and what not to do: We’ve used Jacobs crackers in the past (a la Jamie Oliver) – I don’t really rate this. They dont provide much flavour and the texture is a bit crumbly. I’ve tried raw onions mixed through the mince and it is horribly wrong. Onions never go soft if they aren’t cooked properly, and stay acidic and unpleasant We’ve used BBQ or Cajun seasoning in the beef mix before now. …

Mango & Lime Lassi Posset

I survived on mango lassis when I was living in India. Like an Indian-style smoothie, lassis are made from yoghurt mixed with water and spices, and can be salty or sweet. Salty lassis take a bit of getting used to but are delicious on a cold day. Different parts of India have different preferences and flavourings. In North India, we mainly drank mango lassis. The mangoes over there are so fresh and juicy, you can squash them up with your hands into a pulp, make a small hole in one of the ends and suck out the juice. This, mixed with goats milk yoghurt, plenty of jaggery (unrefined cane sugar) and spices is the basic foundation of a lassi, and absolute heaven after a rich spicy meal. I’ve been working on a dessert to finish the evening of my Curry & Chips Club (my first Curry For Change supper club which will raise money for the charity Find Your Feet). I have come up with the Mango Lassi Posset: a  smooth and creamy lime posset with all the beautiful flavours of a lassi. It’s …

Leek bhajis

For me, onion bhajis are one of the things I get most excited about when I go for an Indian meal. Their like a little explosion of everything I love about Indian food- the staples of a great curry paste (onion, ginger and chilli), carefully selected and delicate spices, and plenty of fresh coriander. In India, bhajis are more commonly known as pakora (fritters), and don’t exclusively contain onion. Some have potatoes, spinach, peas, chicken, or anything you fancy. The Onion bhajis that we know and love in this country have a distinctive taste and smell from ajwan and nigella seeds, and can range from big boulders served in chip shops to tiny delicate nests. In any case, When done properly they have a crisp fried onion shell and perfectly cooked batter and soft onions in the centre. I recently had the opportunity to learn how to make Spinach and Onion Pakoras with head chef Rakesh at Cinnamon Kitchen. His trick was to combine the chopped onions and spinach with spices and salt before leaving it …

Avocado & lemon pesto spaghetti with Parma ham

This delicious pesto dish is ready to eat in the time it takes to cook the pasta and is a great way to use up really ripe avocados. I use a couple of tricks to make this recipe extra special – using avocado creates a light and creamy pesto, and is a healthier alternative to cream or oil. I also add a little of the starchy cooking water to the sauce to help it to coat all of the spaghetti. Serves 4 Ingredients: 300g spaghetti a large bunch of fresh basil 2 garlic cloves 50g pine nuts, toasted 50g parmesan cheese, grated 2 avocados, really ripe ½ lemon, zest only 4 slices of Parma ham salt and pepper (You will need a pestle and mortar or a food processor) Preheat the grill on a medium heat and boil a kettle. Add the spaghetti to a large pan of salted boiling water and cook according to the packet instructions. Meanwhile, roughly chop up the basil and add to your pestle and mortar with the garlic, parmesan, …

green coriander chutney

I’m working on some lovely Indian dishes in my little old kitchen at the moment and here’s a little taster of things to come. A punchy, green chutney full of chilli, curry leaf, lemon and herbs! It’s perfect with poppadoms, naan bread, drizzled over BBQ meat or kebabs or stirred into soup or dhal! Serves 4 1 big handful of coriander 1 sprig of curry leaves 1 garlic clove 2 green finger chillies 1 sprig of mint mint the juice from ½ a lemon a glug of groundnut oil a pinch of salt a pinch of sugar Roughly chop the herbs, chillies and the garlic and blend everything in a mini food processor to a puree. Taste and add more seasoning if required. Done.

Black & White Pudding Pasties

Hello, I’m Beth and I’m addicted to black pudding. I regularly exceed my RDA of iron and I am constantly looking for new ways to get my next fix. Last weekend, with an abundance of black and white pudding I have in my fridge from The Bury Black Pudding Company, I decided to find another excuse to ‘go to town’ on blood pudding and created the perfect lunch for my cousins to enjoy whilst working hard on their allotment! If you’ve never had white pudding i’d highly recommend it. It’s like black pudding, but without the blood (so basically a sausage, with plenty of pepper, spices and a firm, meaty texture). Ingredients 1 onion 2 medium potatoes 1 large black pudding sausage, chubb 1 large white pudding sausage a good glug of rapeseed oil 1 tsp English mustard 1 bay leaf a small sprig of thyme a handful of parsley 5 sage leaves 1 sheet of shortcrust pastry 1 egg salt and pepper a punnet of cress, for garnish Preheat the oven to 180°c Peel and dice up the …

Shortbread Jammy Dodgers

My first memory of cooking is making salt dough decorations. If you’ve never made salt dough with kids it’s so much fun. The recipe is basic: 2 parts flour, 1 part salt & 1 part water. Mix into a dough, roll and cut into whatever shapes you want. Pierce each with a pen so you can string them up later. Bake in a low oven at 100˚c for 3-4 hours until they are completely dry. Cool, then paint and hang with string. Note: do not eat! You will be sick. Now, the only biscuits I really enjoy baking (and can be trusted to make) are ones where all the ingredients are mixed up in a food processor, rolled and cut with my retro cutters, just like salt dough. The shortbread recipe I use is from Adam Stokes on Great British Chefs. It’s tried and tested and i’ve made them so many times – it makes light buttery biscuits that are lush and soft in the middle with a short snap. I’ve taken the vanilla and cinnamon from the recipe …